jsbowden: (Wheelie)
( Jun. 10th, 2010 08:30 am)
The Rules of the Game Are:
Bold the women by whom you own books
Italicize those by whom you’ve read something of (short stories count).
*Star those you don’t recognize
Unmarked are those whose work you have not read

I've got nothing else to do right now, so why not... )

And there you have it. There are some names I sort of recognize from browsing the shelves at B&N and Borders, but not so much I could have pulled them from memory, so I didn't count them.
Tags:
jsbowden: (Wheelie)
( Jun. 10th, 2010 08:30 am)
The Rules of the Game Are:
Bold the women by whom you own books
Italicize those by whom you’ve read something of (short stories count).
*Star those you don’t recognize
Unmarked are those whose work you have not read

I've got nothing else to do right now, so why not... )

And there you have it. There are some names I sort of recognize from browsing the shelves at B&N and Borders, but not so much I could have pulled them from memory, so I didn't count them.
Tags:
jsbowden: (Wheelie)
( Jun. 10th, 2010 08:30 am)
The Rules of the Game Are:
Bold the women by whom you own books
Italicize those by whom you’ve read something of (short stories count).
*Star those you don’t recognize
Unmarked are those whose work you have not read

I've got nothing else to do right now, so why not... )

And there you have it. There are some names I sort of recognize from browsing the shelves at B&N and Borders, but not so much I could have pulled them from memory, so I didn't count them.
Tags:
jsbowden: (Default)
( Apr. 7th, 2009 09:25 am)
So, I picked up New Spring years ago now, and for some reason, apparently, I NEVER ACTUALLY READ IT. I thought I had read it, but yesterday when I picked it up and started it, I realized that what I read is the short story from the Legends anthology, and not the novel. Moiraine has always been my favorite character from the series, so this was a pleasant surprise and a nice read.
Tags:
jsbowden: (Default)
( Apr. 7th, 2009 09:25 am)
So, I picked up New Spring years ago now, and for some reason, apparently, I NEVER ACTUALLY READ IT. I thought I had read it, but yesterday when I picked it up and started it, I realized that what I read is the short story from the Legends anthology, and not the novel. Moiraine has always been my favorite character from the series, so this was a pleasant surprise and a nice read.
Tags:
jsbowden: (Default)
( Apr. 7th, 2009 09:25 am)
So, I picked up New Spring years ago now, and for some reason, apparently, I NEVER ACTUALLY READ IT. I thought I had read it, but yesterday when I picked it up and started it, I realized that what I read is the short story from the Legends anthology, and not the novel. Moiraine has always been my favorite character from the series, so this was a pleasant surprise and a nice read.
Tags:
Okay, so I finally finished Anathem. This is a spoiler free review, but assuming comments are at some point made, I cannot guarantee the contents of such.

Stephenson managed to do something well that I don't think he's done before...an ending. This book has a denoument. A good one, IMO. We don't get all the answers, and the world will keep on turning, but the plot concludes and it isn't the usual abrupt stop.

Over all, I enjoyed this. I'm going to have to read it again, because I know I missed things at the front while trying to map Stephenson's insistence on using his own made up words over perfectly serviceable equivalent actual words.

The first third of the book is just getting acquainted with the world. It's complex, has a long history, which we get some random bits of, has some oddly stratified social structures which appear to be logical outcomes of the bits of history we're exposed to, and, overall, consistency with its own internal structures. Stephenson has a huge file full of notes, outlines, and logic trees somewhere just to track the complexity and flow of the world he's built. I'd love to get my digital digits on that.

The writing is engaging and once you learn what words actually mean (Seriously...come on...speely? Call it a monitor or a screen already. Speelycam? Camcorder. Jeejah? Cell phone. Quit screwing with us). As I stated in a previous entry, there are some very good reasons for the made up terminology. There are no direct analogs in reality, and using words that describe sort of related reality and trying to point out the differences would actually have been worse and caused more confusion. The three previous examples however, are where we see the author get needlessly superfluous with this.

The plot, once it gets up and running, doesn't stop. It was a hard read in the beginning, mostly because it's a fairly crunchy book that requires paying attention and thinking about what you're reading and tracking the world building.

Then it starts moving. And it doesn't stop. By the time the plot shifts into high gear, the reader should be more than familiar with the terminology and the world and be ready to move on to the book's main themes. This book reminded me of Cryptonomicon in style and pacing. It's longer, but it's on the same scale. Oh, and unlike Cryptonomicon, it has an ending instead of just a stopping point. You'll get some treatises on quantum theory, which I'm sure are adaptations of the actual thing modified for ease of understanding, as well as to make the world work, instead of the raw calculus dumped into the text of Cryptonomicon. The presentation flows well and is integrated into the way the world works. Yes, it's an infodump on the part of the author, but it's not quite so blatant as raw equations thrown into the text, and it fits the scenes where it happens.

As stated in my previous entry, the world we're on has regional ethnicities and religions, and variations of the religious types within a region, as well as small enclaves of religions from other parts of the world. It's the little things that make a world easier to believe in, and things like that are details that I really enjoy seeing.

I wasn't really up for the complexity and work needed to read Anathem when I first picked it up, so I read Pratchett's Nation after I was about two hundred pages in or so. Oddly enough, it's like Anathem Lite. The books even cover similar themes. Pratchett, as always, delivers a book that's both enjoyable, seemingly fluffy, and if you stop and pay attention, has underlying depth and currents that will make you think or thwim. Pratchett's ability to write in a way that makes me visualize the awesomeness always makes me smile (captain of a wooden sailing ship (small ship of the line) singing madly, lashed to the wheel, as it plows through a jungle on the crest of a tsunami? I SOOOOO want to see that). I highly recommend this. It's a quick read, and it's engaging and fun. If you're familiar with Pterry already, this is not a Discworld novel and has a somewhat different feel about it, but it's still got that style.
Tags:
Okay, so I finally finished Anathem. This is a spoiler free review, but assuming comments are at some point made, I cannot guarantee the contents of such.

Stephenson managed to do something well that I don't think he's done before...an ending. This book has a denoument. A good one, IMO. We don't get all the answers, and the world will keep on turning, but the plot concludes and it isn't the usual abrupt stop.

Over all, I enjoyed this. I'm going to have to read it again, because I know I missed things at the front while trying to map Stephenson's insistence on using his own made up words over perfectly serviceable equivalent actual words.

The first third of the book is just getting acquainted with the world. It's complex, has a long history, which we get some random bits of, has some oddly stratified social structures which appear to be logical outcomes of the bits of history we're exposed to, and, overall, consistency with its own internal structures. Stephenson has a huge file full of notes, outlines, and logic trees somewhere just to track the complexity and flow of the world he's built. I'd love to get my digital digits on that.

The writing is engaging and once you learn what words actually mean (Seriously...come on...speely? Call it a monitor or a screen already. Speelycam? Camcorder. Jeejah? Cell phone. Quit screwing with us). As I stated in a previous entry, there are some very good reasons for the made up terminology. There are no direct analogs in reality, and using words that describe sort of related reality and trying to point out the differences would actually have been worse and caused more confusion. The three previous examples however, are where we see the author get needlessly superfluous with this.

The plot, once it gets up and running, doesn't stop. It was a hard read in the beginning, mostly because it's a fairly crunchy book that requires paying attention and thinking about what you're reading and tracking the world building.

Then it starts moving. And it doesn't stop. By the time the plot shifts into high gear, the reader should be more than familiar with the terminology and the world and be ready to move on to the book's main themes. This book reminded me of Cryptonomicon in style and pacing. It's longer, but it's on the same scale. Oh, and unlike Cryptonomicon, it has an ending instead of just a stopping point. You'll get some treatises on quantum theory, which I'm sure are adaptations of the actual thing modified for ease of understanding, as well as to make the world work, instead of the raw calculus dumped into the text of Cryptonomicon. The presentation flows well and is integrated into the way the world works. Yes, it's an infodump on the part of the author, but it's not quite so blatant as raw equations thrown into the text, and it fits the scenes where it happens.

As stated in my previous entry, the world we're on has regional ethnicities and religions, and variations of the religious types within a region, as well as small enclaves of religions from other parts of the world. It's the little things that make a world easier to believe in, and things like that are details that I really enjoy seeing.

I wasn't really up for the complexity and work needed to read Anathem when I first picked it up, so I read Pratchett's Nation after I was about two hundred pages in or so. Oddly enough, it's like Anathem Lite. The books even cover similar themes. Pratchett, as always, delivers a book that's both enjoyable, seemingly fluffy, and if you stop and pay attention, has underlying depth and currents that will make you think or thwim. Pratchett's ability to write in a way that makes me visualize the awesomeness always makes me smile (captain of a wooden sailing ship (small ship of the line) singing madly, lashed to the wheel, as it plows through a jungle on the crest of a tsunami? I SOOOOO want to see that). I highly recommend this. It's a quick read, and it's engaging and fun. If you're familiar with Pterry already, this is not a Discworld novel and has a somewhat different feel about it, but it's still got that style.
Tags:
Okay, so I finally finished Anathem. This is a spoiler free review, but assuming comments are at some point made, I cannot guarantee the contents of such.

Stephenson managed to do something well that I don't think he's done before...an ending. This book has a denoument. A good one, IMO. We don't get all the answers, and the world will keep on turning, but the plot concludes and it isn't the usual abrupt stop.

Over all, I enjoyed this. I'm going to have to read it again, because I know I missed things at the front while trying to map Stephenson's insistence on using his own made up words over perfectly serviceable equivalent actual words.

The first third of the book is just getting acquainted with the world. It's complex, has a long history, which we get some random bits of, has some oddly stratified social structures which appear to be logical outcomes of the bits of history we're exposed to, and, overall, consistency with its own internal structures. Stephenson has a huge file full of notes, outlines, and logic trees somewhere just to track the complexity and flow of the world he's built. I'd love to get my digital digits on that.

The writing is engaging and once you learn what words actually mean (Seriously...come on...speely? Call it a monitor or a screen already. Speelycam? Camcorder. Jeejah? Cell phone. Quit screwing with us). As I stated in a previous entry, there are some very good reasons for the made up terminology. There are no direct analogs in reality, and using words that describe sort of related reality and trying to point out the differences would actually have been worse and caused more confusion. The three previous examples however, are where we see the author get needlessly superfluous with this.

The plot, once it gets up and running, doesn't stop. It was a hard read in the beginning, mostly because it's a fairly crunchy book that requires paying attention and thinking about what you're reading and tracking the world building.

Then it starts moving. And it doesn't stop. By the time the plot shifts into high gear, the reader should be more than familiar with the terminology and the world and be ready to move on to the book's main themes. This book reminded me of Cryptonomicon in style and pacing. It's longer, but it's on the same scale. Oh, and unlike Cryptonomicon, it has an ending instead of just a stopping point. You'll get some treatises on quantum theory, which I'm sure are adaptations of the actual thing modified for ease of understanding, as well as to make the world work, instead of the raw calculus dumped into the text of Cryptonomicon. The presentation flows well and is integrated into the way the world works. Yes, it's an infodump on the part of the author, but it's not quite so blatant as raw equations thrown into the text, and it fits the scenes where it happens.

As stated in my previous entry, the world we're on has regional ethnicities and religions, and variations of the religious types within a region, as well as small enclaves of religions from other parts of the world. It's the little things that make a world easier to believe in, and things like that are details that I really enjoy seeing.

I wasn't really up for the complexity and work needed to read Anathem when I first picked it up, so I read Pratchett's Nation after I was about two hundred pages in or so. Oddly enough, it's like Anathem Lite. The books even cover similar themes. Pratchett, as always, delivers a book that's both enjoyable, seemingly fluffy, and if you stop and pay attention, has underlying depth and currents that will make you think or thwim. Pratchett's ability to write in a way that makes me visualize the awesomeness always makes me smile (captain of a wooden sailing ship (small ship of the line) singing madly, lashed to the wheel, as it plows through a jungle on the crest of a tsunami? I SOOOOO want to see that). I highly recommend this. It's a quick read, and it's engaging and fun. If you're familiar with Pterry already, this is not a Discworld novel and has a somewhat different feel about it, but it's still got that style.
Tags:
Okay, so I'm about half way through Anathem, and I have to dump some stuff here.

Hey, if you haven't read it yet, you might want to skip this... )

Once the plot gets up and running, don't blink.
Tags:
Okay, so I'm about half way through Anathem, and I have to dump some stuff here.

Hey, if you haven't read it yet, you might want to skip this... )

Once the plot gets up and running, don't blink.
Tags:
Okay, so I'm about half way through Anathem, and I have to dump some stuff here.

Hey, if you haven't read it yet, you might want to skip this... )

Once the plot gets up and running, don't blink.
Tags:
jsbowden: (Default)
( Apr. 25th, 2008 08:09 am)
So, I read Old Man's War yesterday.

I forget the term normally used for the male equivalent of a 'Mary Sue', but really, the main character is a writer from Ohio.

Not that it was a bad book. It was an enjoyable enough read, but I couldn't bury that tidbit above while doing so.

If I were feeling charitable, I'd say it was because making people up from whole cloth is hard and it was just easier to write what he knew.

Someday, I may be in a charitable mood. Today, I'm feeling snarky.
Tags:
jsbowden: (Default)
( Apr. 25th, 2008 08:09 am)
So, I read Old Man's War yesterday.

I forget the term normally used for the male equivalent of a 'Mary Sue', but really, the main character is a writer from Ohio.

Not that it was a bad book. It was an enjoyable enough read, but I couldn't bury that tidbit above while doing so.

If I were feeling charitable, I'd say it was because making people up from whole cloth is hard and it was just easier to write what he knew.

Someday, I may be in a charitable mood. Today, I'm feeling snarky.
Tags:
jsbowden: (Default)
( Apr. 25th, 2008 08:09 am)
So, I read Old Man's War yesterday.

I forget the term normally used for the male equivalent of a 'Mary Sue', but really, the main character is a writer from Ohio.

Not that it was a bad book. It was an enjoyable enough read, but I couldn't bury that tidbit above while doing so.

If I were feeling charitable, I'd say it was because making people up from whole cloth is hard and it was just easier to write what he knew.

Someday, I may be in a charitable mood. Today, I'm feeling snarky.
Tags:
I got a visit today from the Mormons!

They asked me if I had read the good book. I responded that I had. They then asked what I thought of it. I told them that I thought it sucked.

I was REALLY hoping they'd ask me why, but no, they just kept smiling and asked if I knew anyone who might be more receptive. I told them to try the neighbors...the only neighbors who aren't atheist, Buddhist, Hindu, or Islamic weren't home. I'm sure they had a wonderful time on our little cul de sac.

I really wanted to complain to them about the plot holes, outright contradictions, spotty writing (obviously done by committee), retcons, and editorial additions done ham handedly in a different style, obviously without authorial consent or input. At the start, it has six different beginnings. The ending is horrible too. It can't decide if it wants to be a tragic, a comedic, or a happy one. And god, the main character. So two dimensional. He's either a toddler, or a caricature. And the supporting characters? Please. The whole thing needs to be scrapped and rewritten. There's some nice poetry in there, between the excessive sex and violence. But it's not enough to save the story.

I could go on, but I won't.
I got a visit today from the Mormons!

They asked me if I had read the good book. I responded that I had. They then asked what I thought of it. I told them that I thought it sucked.

I was REALLY hoping they'd ask me why, but no, they just kept smiling and asked if I knew anyone who might be more receptive. I told them to try the neighbors...the only neighbors who aren't atheist, Buddhist, Hindu, or Islamic weren't home. I'm sure they had a wonderful time on our little cul de sac.

I really wanted to complain to them about the plot holes, outright contradictions, spotty writing (obviously done by committee), retcons, and editorial additions done ham handedly in a different style, obviously without authorial consent or input. At the start, it has six different beginnings. The ending is horrible too. It can't decide if it wants to be a tragic, a comedic, or a happy one. And god, the main character. So two dimensional. He's either a toddler, or a caricature. And the supporting characters? Please. The whole thing needs to be scrapped and rewritten. There's some nice poetry in there, between the excessive sex and violence. But it's not enough to save the story.

I could go on, but I won't.
I got a visit today from the Mormons!

They asked me if I had read the good book. I responded that I had. They then asked what I thought of it. I told them that I thought it sucked.

I was REALLY hoping they'd ask me why, but no, they just kept smiling and asked if I knew anyone who might be more receptive. I told them to try the neighbors...the only neighbors who aren't atheist, Buddhist, Hindu, or Islamic weren't home. I'm sure they had a wonderful time on our little cul de sac.

I really wanted to complain to them about the plot holes, outright contradictions, spotty writing (obviously done by committee), retcons, and editorial additions done ham handedly in a different style, obviously without authorial consent or input. At the start, it has six different beginnings. The ending is horrible too. It can't decide if it wants to be a tragic, a comedic, or a happy one. And god, the main character. So two dimensional. He's either a toddler, or a caricature. And the supporting characters? Please. The whole thing needs to be scrapped and rewritten. There's some nice poetry in there, between the excessive sex and violence. But it's not enough to save the story.

I could go on, but I won't.
jsbowden: (ROFLOLZOMFGWFTBBQ!?!?!)
( Mar. 18th, 2008 12:15 pm)
Next thing you know, the alt.tasteless FAQ will be available in print. This isn't it:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1890159026

It's amazing some of the things that get published.
Tags:
jsbowden: (ROFLOLZOMFGWFTBBQ!?!?!)
( Mar. 18th, 2008 12:15 pm)
Next thing you know, the alt.tasteless FAQ will be available in print. This isn't it:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1890159026

It's amazing some of the things that get published.
Tags:
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